The colors of “Amazing Georgia”

As I work at slowing my pace in retirement years, one of my passions now is coloring. No, not with crayons like I did as a child, but with pencils or gel pens. The whole new trend of adults turning back to coloring is something many people in my Boomer generation may want to tryContinue reading “The colors of “Amazing Georgia””

The unveiling of my memoir review copy

The day I unsealed the small white box that held the galley copy of my memoir, I was thankful I had the foresight to ask my husband to capture the moment. “That’s a moment you can never get back,” an author friend told me when she saw the video posted on social media. Now thatContinue reading “The unveiling of my memoir review copy”

‘If you ever get another newsroom, call me’

On August 9, 2019, the day I was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Hall of Fame, my friend and former colleague Terry Manning wrote perhaps the nicest and certainly the most extensive tribute about my career and our professional relationship. It is, of course, also a good piece of writing. TerryContinue reading “‘If you ever get another newsroom, call me’”

Justice, redemption: My letter to the editor

After all the years of being “the editor” of a local newspaper, it is a thrill to have one of my letters published by my local newspaper, the Savannah Morning News. Here’s the link.   https://www.savannahnow.com/opinion/20190716/letters-to-editor-wednesday-justice-redemption-for-local-lynching-victims  

My Women’s History: ‘How did you get here?’

This is my final weekly blog post related to Women’s History Month. The posts have been  about accomplishments and lessons from women in my village. These are excerpts from my upcoming memoir Coming Full Circle: Jim Crow to Journalism. At the Providence (RI) Evening Bulletin, in my first newsroom job there were two professional women journalistsContinue reading “My Women’s History: ‘How did you get here?’”

My Women’s History: ‘Time passes, but will you?’

In March for Women’s History Month I am presenting weekly blog posts about accomplishments and lessons from women in my village. These are excerpts from my upcoming memoir Coming Full Circle: Jim Crow to Journalism. Our black teachers in segregated schools gave us life lessons with no apologies. Their instruction went way beyond reading, writing andContinue reading “My Women’s History: ‘Time passes, but will you?’”

My Women’s History: Meeting a higher standard

In March for Women’s History Month I am presenting weekly blog posts about accomplishments and lessons from women in my village. These are excerpts from my upcoming memoir Coming Full Circle: Jim Crow to Journalism. Saturday afternoon shopping during the 1950s and 1960s with my grandmother on Broughton Street, Savannah’s main downtown thoroughfare, was always aContinue reading “My Women’s History: Meeting a higher standard”

My Women’s History: Eye contact and firm handshakes

In March for Women’s History Month I am presenting weekly blog posts about accomplishments and lessons from women in my village. These are excerpts from my upcoming memoir Coming Full Circle: Jim Crow to Journalism.   My mother, Gloria Walker, began her career working in retail sales at Camp Stewart (later Fort Stewart), a Georgia militaryContinue reading “My Women’s History: Eye contact and firm handshakes”

My Black History: Lady Bird Johnson and my grandmother’s mirror

Throughout February 2019, I posted brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” This is my final post for the month. My membership in the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) and my advocacy for media diversity opened a lot of doors for me. Working on committees andContinue reading “My Black History: Lady Bird Johnson and my grandmother’s mirror”

My Black History: Social probation

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” In Savannah my Spelman College village influence drove some of the rules for me at home. Wearing a dress or skirt, never pants, was de rigueur, required because at the time, Spelman womenContinue reading “My Black History: Social probation”

My Black History: An opportunity to do some good

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” On the day the deacon stopped me in the hallway at Mt. Zion Church, I could see the pride in his eyes, which made me think about what he had just described. ItContinue reading “My Black History: An opportunity to do some good”

My Black History: ‘Negro girls don’t work for newspapers’

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” I remember the day I told my family I wanted to become a journalist. I was in the 11th grade, living in a city not necessarily known for outstanding accomplishments in journalism atContinue reading “My Black History: ‘Negro girls don’t work for newspapers’”

My Black History: ‘Sister Lloyd, you were IN charge’

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” “Ooooh-ooo-wee, Sister Lloyd!” a deacon said one Sunday morning as we were passing each other in the hallway near the office at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Arlington, Virginia. My husband and IContinue reading “My Black History: ‘Sister Lloyd, you were IN charge’”

My Black History: Could life get any better?

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” In 2013, just as I was about to retire from Gannett and daily journalism, a call came from Crystal Williams Chancellor, director of communications for the Women’s Media Center based in Washington, DC. Continue reading “My Black History: Could life get any better?”

My Black History: Learning to write well is first step to success

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” As a professor, many students I encountered were not good writers — not just journalistic writing but writing period. They had not benefited from the elementary and junior high school lessons we hadContinue reading “My Black History: Learning to write well is first step to success”

My Black History: Diversity decisions

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” In this post, I describe how our daughter, Shelby, reminded us that our lessons in diversity should apply to her when we moved our family to Greenville, SC. The years in Greenville, SouthContinue reading “My Black History: Diversity decisions”

My Black History: Losing ground with diversity

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” This is part of a story about the discontent among black journalists at The Washington Post.  Eventually some of us started to share our concerns with management, including with editor Ben Bradlee. HeContinue reading “My Black History: Losing ground with diversity”

My Black History: A clash of cultures

Sometimes having a seat at the table can be a clash of cultures for working women who are raising families. It could mean having to make choices in life, choices between having power at work, power at home or no power. In my case, the choice was to have it all. As the number ofContinue reading “My Black History: A clash of cultures”

My Black History: A Spelman student in the Movement

Today and throughout February, I am posting brief excerpts from my upcoming memoir, “Coming Full Circle — From Jim Crow to Journalism.” As a freshman in the late 1960s, our world was changing from Jim Crow to the Civil Rights Movement.  Before we arrived, Spelman students had a history of being active in local civilContinue reading “My Black History: A Spelman student in the Movement”